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Posted on October 21, 2015
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StoryMap: Meet the Yudja, Brazil’s Forest Guardians

Posted on October 21, 2015
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By Sarah Parsons

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The Yudja are one of many indigenous groups who call Brazil’s Amazon rainforest home. For decades, they’ve sustainably managed their community forest, relying on it for food, shelter and livelihoods. Yet like many forest communities around the world, the Yudja now face unprecedented threats in the form of new roads, hydroelectric dams, mines and more. What will become of them and the forests they inhabit? The StoryMap below provides an inside look at the Yudja—their culture, their forests and the challenges they face—through interactive maps, photos and more. It also examines community forests globally, including the role they play in protecting biodiversity, preserving livelihoods and curbing climate change. Click on the image below for a multimedia tour of the Yudja and their forests.

StoryMapClick here to launch the StoryMap.

This article originally appeared on WRI Insights. BANNER PHOTO: Photo by André D’elia. PHOTO 1: The Yudja rely on their community forest for food, shelter and livelihoods. Photo by André D’elia.

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