Kebakaran Hutan di Indonesia kembali Menyala, Mengancam Kawasan yang Dilindungi dan Lahan Gambut

Kabut asap ekstrem yang disebabkan oleh kebakaran hutan dan semak di Sumatera and Kalimantan, Indonesia merupakan masalah tidak berkesudahan yang memengaruhi kualitas hidup and ekonomi masyarakat lokal maupun negara tetangga. Seiringan dengan mendekatnya musim kering, angkat titik api mulai meningkat, terutama di provinsi Riau, Sumatera yang rawan terbakar. Kebakaran tersebut sudah mulai mengancam beberapa ekosistem yang kaya akan keanekaragaman hayati serta tinggi karbon di negara ini—hutan lindung dan lahan gambut.

Menurut data Titik Api Aktif NASA pada platform Global Forest Watch Fires, setengah dari peringatan titik api di provinsi Riau terjadi di kawasan-kawasan yang dilindungi atau wilayah moratorium hutan di mana perkembangan baru dilarang menurut kebijakan nasional. Sekitar 38 persen dari peringatan titik api Riau terdapat pada lokasi lahan gambut yang kaya akan stok karbon dan dapat melepaskan gas rumah kaca ke dalam atmosfer yang semakin memicu perubahan iklim global.

 Peringatan titik api di Kawasan yang Dilindungi, Riau, Indonesia

24 Juni – 1 Juli 2015

  Continue reading

Indonesia’s Forest Fires Reignite, Threatening Protected Areas and Peatlands

By Lisa JohnstonTjokorda Nirarta “Koni” SamadhiSusan Minnemeyer and Nigel Sizer

This article originally appeared on Insights.

Extreme haze caused by forest and bush fires throughout Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia has been a perpetual problem affecting the quality of life and economy of local residents and neighboring countries. As this year’s dry season approaches, the fires are just starting to pick up, especially in the fire-prone province of Riau, Sumatra. They’re already threatening some of the most biodiverse and carbon-rich ecosystems in the country—protected forests and peatlands.

According to NASA’s Active Fire Data on the Global Forest Watch Fires platform, half of the fire alerts in Riau Province1 are occurring in protected areas or those where new development is prohibited under Indonesia’s national forest moratorium. And an alarming 38 percent of Riau’s fire alerts are on carbon-rich peatlands, releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and fueling global climate change.

 

 

 

Continue reading

Ecuadorian Amazon: Black or Green Gold?

This article originally appeared on Terra-i.org

By Bernadette Menzinger. English translation by Paul Peters (CIAT). Spanish version available here.

TERRA-I ANALYSIS   |   Ecuador is recognized as one of the biodiverse hotspots on earth, underneath the Amazon rainforest lies the country’s oil reservoir. With the oil companies and cleared routes come settlers, therefore more and more of this diverse rainforest is being cut down.

Since the oil concerns entered the Ecuadorian Amazon 45 years ago, they keep exploring and exploiting the area. The Terra-i detections reveal a total habitat loss of 87,525 Ha, 16,943 Ha (19%) is part of protected areas, between January 2004 and February 2015.

Terra_i1
Map of forest cover loss detections by the Terra-i system from January 2004 to February 2015. The main hotspots of deforestation are located near the city Coca and in proximity to oil drilling platforms, presented in the white rectangles.

Oil vs Biodiversity in Ecuador

After extensive banana exportation the main economic gain of Ecuador shifted towards oil in the 1970s. While the oil prices are fluctuating, the demand for black gold remains high. The exploration and detection beneath the Amazonas of new oil fields leads to the exploitation of the resource and natural and cultural variety can be put in danger. The biodiversity is enormous, there are 2500 registered tree and shrub species, but the estimation goes up to 3100. Although there are protected areas, the government does not restrict the oil companies entering these areas (GREENBERG et al., 2005).

Oil companies construct access roads and drilling platforms to exploit the region for almost 50 years now. Attracted by these cleared routes people settle nearby, cut and burn more forest for agriculture or domestic animals (BUTLER, 2012). An example would be an oil pipeline which is 420 km long, traversing the Amazon and the Andean mountain range clearing forest in each habitat (YASUNI GREEN GOLD 2008). Another example of destruction is a 150 km long road right through the Yasuní National Park, which was built in the mid-1990s (GREENBERG et al., 2005). By means of those examples, it has been proven that the construction of roads and subsequent settlers has the biggest impact on the exploitation of the Amazon rainforest and its related deforestation.

Terra-i detects the impact of oil drilling

93.9 % of the Ecuadorian Amazon is covered with forest, almost 11 million hectares (Ha), from which 2.7 million Ha (24.5%) are part of Protected Areas. Furthermore the region is considered as one of the most biodiverse places on earth (BUTLER, 2012). The consequences of the exploration and exploitation for oil can be observed in the natural vegetation loss. The Terra-i system detected a total forest cover loss of 87 525 Ha in the last ten years, 8,142 Ha (approximately 8,000 football fields) per year. Oil companies built several drilling platforms in the northern provinces of the Ecuadorian Amazon that now see the highest deforestation rate. Therefore Orellana has the highest habitat loss with an accumulated deforestation of 25,606 Ha in the past decade, followed by Pastaza (28,368 Ha), Sucumbíos (16,187 Ha) and Napo (3,893 Ha). This is equivalent to a deforestation rate of 0.96% of the total forested area in these four departments. This is 2.28 times higher than in the remaining forested areas of the ecuatorian Amazon where the rate of change was of 0.42%.

Terra_i2Infographic showing the natural vegetation loss in the provinces of the Ecuadorian Amazon based on the Terra-i system in the period of January 2004 to February 2015.

Density Analysis of Deforestation

The deforestation in the Amazon forests of Ecuador happens on a small scale. The best way to visualize the most affected areas a density analysis is used. The concentration of deforestation is calculated as the percentage of forest loss per 100 Ha. The results show clearly a trend of vegetation loss in the proximity of drilling platforms, especially near the city Coca. Furthermore the map reveals a deforestation of 19% (16,943 Ha) of the Protected Areas. Several access roads to the platforms were built, which are followed by colonization, deforestation and illegal logging (BASS et al., 2010).

Terra_i3Density Analysis of natural vegetation loss in the Amazonas of Ecuador, based on the Terra-i system, in the period from January 2004 to February 2015.

Reduce the impact of oil drilling in the Ecuadorian Amazonas

As mentioned above the construction of access roads and the following settlers with their activities are the main drivers of deforestation in conjunction with oil drilling. FINER et al. (2015) propose among others the method of extended reach drilling (Figure 4). Instead of several platforms drilling vertical, one platform can drill almost horizontal and with various pipes. Therefore larger areas can be reached and the impact on the vegetation cover is reduced.

Terra_i4
Extended reach drilling to reduce the impact on the vegetation cover.

References

BASS, M.S., FINER, M., JENKINS, C.N., KREFT, H., CISNEROS-HEREDIA, D.F., MCCRACKEN, S.F. (2010): “Global Conservation Significance of Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park.” In: PLOS ONE 5(1).

BUTLER, R. (2012): “Oil Extraction: The Impact Oil Production in the Rainforest.” In: Mongabay.

FINER, M., BABBITT, B., NOVOA, S., FERRARESE, F., PAPPALARDO, S. E., MARCHI, DE M., SAUCEDO M., KUMAR, A. (2015): “Future of oil and gas development in the western Amazon.” In: Environmental Research Letters 10. IOP Publishing.

GREENBERG, J. A., KEFAUVER, S. C., STIMSON, H. C., YEATON, C. J., USTIN, S. L. (2005): “Survival analysis of a neotropical rainforest using multitemporal satellite imagery.” In: Remote Sensing of Environment 96. P. 202-211.

YASUNI GREEN GOLD (2008): Sobre el Yasuni. URL: http://www.yasunigreengold.org/

 

BANNER PHOTO: Aerial view of the Amazon Rainforest, near Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas. CIAT (Flickr).

¿Amazonas del Ecuador: Oro Negro o Verde?

Este artículo apareció originalmente en Terra-i.org

Por Bernadette Menzinger. Revisión de la versión en inglés por Paul Peters (CIAT). 

TERRA-I ANÁLISIS   |   Ecuador es reconocido por su gran biodiversidad amazónica, sin embargo, justo debajo de ella, yacen las reservas de petróleo del país. Con las grandes compañías petroleras explorando y explotando este recurso subterráneo desde hace más de 45 años, hay apertura de caminos y la subsiguiente atracción de colonos, que van cortando más selva, causando destrucción del hábitat natural.

Las detecciones de Terra-i de enero de 2004 hasta febrero de 2015, han revelado una pérdida de hábitat de 87,525 Ha, un área similar a la de la ciudad de Roma. De los cuales, un 19% (16,943 Ha), han sido detectados dentro de áreas protegidas.

Terra_i1
Mapa de detecciones de pérdida de cobertura natural resultado del sistema Terra-i, para el periodo Enero 2004 hasta Febrero 2015. Los principales focos de deforestación están cerca de la ciudad de Coca y en cercanía de plataformas de petróleo, presentado en los rectángulos blancos.

Petróleo Vs Biodiversidad

Hasta los años setenta, el principal renglón de la economía ecuatoriana fue la exportación de banano, a partir de ese periodo, el petróleo se fue convirtiendo en la base de su economía. Con el incremento de los precios del petróleo, la demanda por recursos naturales permanece alta, y dado que los principales yacimientos de petróleo están bajo el suelo amazónico, la variedad natural y cultural fue y está siendo puesta en peligro. La biodiversidad es enorme, casi incalculable, existen 2,500 especies de árboles y arbustos, y se estima que podrían ser más de 3,100 especies. A pesar de la delimitación de áreas protegidas, los instrumentos de control y vigilancia gubernamentales no han impedido la invasión de las compañías petroleras dentro de estas áreas (Greenberg et al., 2005).

Es bien documentado que las compañías petroleras han estado explotando la región por casi 50 años, construyendo vías de acceso y plataformas de perforación, colonos llegan atraídos por las nuevas vías, asentándose alrededor de ellas, cortando y quemando más bosque para agricultura y animales de ganado (Buttler, 2012). La logística convencional de exploración, extracción, transporte y almacenamiento del petróleo, constituyen actividades de alto impacto sobre los hábitat naturales. Algunos ejemplos son, el gasoducto de 420 Km que atraviesa los andes, hacia las zonas portuarias sobre la costa (Yasuní Green Gold, 2008), y la vía de 150 Km que atraviesa el Parque Nacional Yasuní (Greenberg et al., 2005).

Terra-i detecta los impactos de la actividad petrolera

Aproximadamente, el 93.9% de la cuenca Amazónica Ecuatoriana está cubierto de bosques ricos en biodiversidad, una área cercana a 11 millones de Ha, de las cuales el 24.5% (2.7 millones de Ha) forman parte de áreas protegidas (Butler, 2012). Las consecuencias de la exploración y explotación petrolera, se evidencian claramente en el hábitat natural desaparecido o fragmentado. El sistema Terra-i detectó pérdidas de bosque cercanas a 87,525 Ha durante los últimos 10 años, equivalentes a 8,142 Ha anuales, aproximadamente 8,000 canchas de futbol. Las provincias al norte del Amazonas ecuatoriano son las más afectadas por la deforestación, debido primero a la relativa facilidad de acceso histórico a la zona, y la subsiguiente concentración de las plataformas petroleras, desde las cuales se dan la apertura de nuevas vías para exploración. Orellana es la provincia con mayores tasas de deforestación acumulada, con 25,606 Ha en la pasada década, seguido de Pastaza con 28,368 Ha, Sucumbíos con 16,187 Ha y Napo con 393 Ha. Esto es equivalente a una tasa de deforestación del 0.96% del área total boscosa en estos 4 departamentos. Esto es 2.28 veces más alto que el resto de áreas boscosas del Amazonas Ecuatoriano, donde la tasa de cambio fue de 0.42%.

Terra_i2
Infografía de los datos de detecciones de pérdida de hábitat de las provincias del Amazonas de Ecuador, basado en los datos de Terra-i, del periodo de Enero 2004 hasta Febrero 2015.

Puntos calientes de deforestación

Dado que las detecciones de la deforestación de Terra-i para el periodo 2004 a 2015, se muestran dispersas y a pequeña escala, un análisis de densidad ha permitido visualizar las áreas más afectadas. La concentración de la deforestación es calculada como el porcentaje de bosque perdido dentro de un área de 100 Ha. Los resultados muestran una concentración de la deforestación en las proximidades de plataformas petroleras, especialmente cerca de la ciudad de Coca. Las detecciones revelan que existen pérdidas de hábitat dentro de áreas protegidas cercanas a 17,000 ha (19%). La construcción de vías de acceso a las zonas de exploración, se convirtió en un motor de deforestación, agravado por la colonización y la tala ilegal (BASS et al., 2010).

Terra_i3
Análisis de densidad de pérdida de cobertura natural en el Amazonas de Ecuador, basado en los datos de Terra-i, en el periodo de Enero 2004 hasta Febrero 2015.

Alternativas para reducir el impacto de la extracción petrolera

Como se ha mencionado anteriormente, la construcción de vías de acceso y el posterior asentamiento de colonos, representa las principales causas de la deforestación, en relación con la extracción petrolera. FINER et al. (2015) propone entre otros, el método de la extensión de la perforación (Figura 4). En vez de varias plataformas perforando vertical, una plataforma puede perforar con varios tubos casi horizontal. De esta forma, áreas más grandes están explotadas y el impacto a la cobertura vegetal se reducida.

Terra_i4
Extensión de la perforación para reducir el impacto a la cobertura de vegetación.

Referencias

BASS, M.S., FINER, M., JENKINS, C.N., KREFT, H., CISNEROS-HEREDIA, D.F., MCCRACKEN, S.F. (2010): “Global Conservation Significance of Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park.” In: PLOS ONE 5(1).

BUTLER, R. (2012): “Oil Extraction: The Impact Oil Production in the Rainforest.” In: Mongabay.

FINER, M., BABBITT, B., NOVOA, S., FERRARESE, F., PAPPALARDO, S. E., MARCHI, DE M., SAUCEDO M., KUMAR, A. (2015): “Future of oil and gas development in the western Amazon.” In: Environmental Research Letters 10. IOP Publishing.

GREENBERG, J. A., KEFAUVER, S. C., STIMSON, H. C., YEATON, C. J., USTIN, S. L. (2005): “Survival analysis of a neotropical rainforest using multitemporal satellite imagery.” In: Remote Sensing of Environment 96. P. 202-211.

YASUNI GREEN GOLD (2008): Sobre el Yasuni. URL: http://www.yasunigreengold.org/

 

BANDERA DE LA FOTO: Vista aérea de la selva amazónica, cerca de Manaus, capital del estado brasileño de Amazonas. CIAT (Flickr).

Map of the Week: NASA Fire Alerts Detect Eruption of Indonesia’s Raung Volcano

By James Anderson and Lisa Johnston

While investigating forest and bush fires in Indonesia the GFW team stumbled across a surprisingly dense cluster of NASA fire alerts on the Global Forest Watch map in East Java, Indonesia.

Turns out these fires weren’t for clearing forest and scrub land for agriculture. In fact, they weren’t human-caused at all. The fire alerts are clustered around the crater of the Raung Volcano, which reportedly began erupting on Sunday, June 28th, sending clouds of ash thousands of meters into the air.

NASA’s Active Fires data uses the MODIS satellites to detect thermal anomalies. The alerts on the volcano may have been triggered by the intense heat from the crater, the presence of lava flow, or burning vegetation on the slopes ignited by lava or ash.

This isn’t the first time NASA fire alerts have detected volcano eruptions- earlier this year Chile’s Calbuco’s volcano triggered several alerts.